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hosting "the doily show" america's greatest satirical lace centerpiece program. (laughter) he is eviscerating that lace work and that's a direct copy quote. our guest tonight is senator rand paul, he's going to be with us. (cheers and applause) he's also where we begin tonight. what has senator paul been up to? >> senator rand paul of kentucky heads to iowa. >> he has planned to visit south carolina and nevada. >> tomorrow he headlines a g.o.p. dinner new hampshire. >> i know rand paul, i think he'll run in 2016. >> what stands between the paul dynasty and 2016? >> well, i'll tell you the first thing that stands between them, three (bleep)ing years! (laughter) that's over 50 new iphones from now. (laughter) why are we talking about this election? that brings us to yet another installment of "can't you at least wait until jon stewart comes back?" (laughter) seriously! this is my last week doing this! it's not just that the media is already ramping up their 2016 coverage, it's this some of them are already trying to wind it down. >> i predict the hard right is going to take over
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
of providing care to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
is give an alternative. we need to start telling the people of america what our health care alternative is and we've yet to do that. >> bob, there's no accountability as we've been saying about other issues because of hyper partisan districts. if i'm a gop member of the house and rail against obama care and say let's defund the government, et cetera, et cetera, and maybe public surveys across the country say that individual is out of step, chances are they're not out of step in their own district. >> i think that's true. one of the problems the republican party has now is that it rode the tea party to power in the house in 2010 and now stuck with all those people. i think john is largely right about what sensible republicans want to do. i'm not sure he's right about the ways out. but you have a whole group of folks who might just take this over the cliff. if boehner holds to the rule that he las to have a majority of the majority before he'll bring anything to the floor, you might just have a government shutdown. and sensible people in the republican party like john brabender, carl row
history, talking about the pentagon papers, the water gate scandal, more recently their top secret america piece -- series, the walter reed medical hospital series that won him the pulitzer. there's the question of like is there going to be an investment -- and is there an investment in had this digital age in terms of that kind of reporting, that kind of granularity, that kind of fact finding and that commitment to stories that may not get a lot of click-throughs at the beginning or ever but matter in terms of information and awareness. >> well, i think the answer is both yes and i hope so, and it has to be. a couple things. a lot of this is due -- a lot of the kinds of journalism that you are talking about is due to the commitment of the families and the people who own these institutions. as john said, the grahams. i was lucky to have worked for the grahams because "newsweek" where i worked for many years is owned by "the washington post" company. i had a lot of of company with him. the grahams were an inspiration. before that i worked in louisville for the bingham family that owned "the
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
at "good morning america" one of the most hot dog resingsists. they would call me and say things. i would say good morning america. i did like the switch board. good morning america. they would say, was that a nazi that you had on today? i would say, yeah. you know, they would say how could you have a nazi on television? listen, i don't book the show, first of all, and if they're all in argentina, you have to fly them here. >> john: but they're blond, blue eyed. >> brand completely aggravate me about where is joan london. how the hell do i know? i'm answering phones. do i know where joan london is? >> john: you coul a receptionis. >> i got fired from that job. >> a beinger the chance of getting married is the same chance as being kidnapped by terrorists. to me they're the same thing. >> that wasn't humidity, that was the 80s. >> the hairdos i've been subjected to, oh my god. >> john: i bet they all looked great. >> where is that from? >> john: one of our staff found it. >> and the shiny jacket. >> john: it was from the 80s. i think one of the best moments are current network. i thought wa
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
are america's last remaining boom industries, and as you saw from the second act, they're basically fused with weiner and this other guy. it's hard to overstate just how successful "deep throat" was for a movie. >> it made an unbelievable amount of money. i guess then came "debbie does dallas" and "beyond the green door." and poor linda lovelace never saw a penny. >> john: oh, what a surprise. >> i know. >> john: what a shock-- a woman in porn did not see lots of money on the backend. ( laughter ) ( applause ) >> careful how you use the term "backend." >> john: i was halfway through that sentence thinking, "i know this end badly." >> has a different meaning in porn. but today, they-- i don't been backend, but they do-- they get highly paid. >> john: right. >> they make a nice living. >> john: the clever thing about this movie it's the same story told twice. you get the glammuous version of it for the first half of the film when it is funny, in which are you appear and the second half you get the reality of what you've just seen, which was appalling. >> horrible. >> john: because she suffe
% of all children live in poverty. >> stephanie: in america. >> in america. >> stephanie: you say your wealth inequality statistics are staggering, and people just hear that, but i think they don't know what that means, but the word staggering, i think is dead on, don't you? >> yeah, i mean there's words in the industrialized nation, and it has gotten a lot worse, and what he used to pride ours on, what the american dream has always been, it's upward mobility that you can be born with nothing and then die a rich person. and the statistics now are that this really doesn't happen anymore. you get to be in the middle class the same way you get to be king, by virtue of birth. we just don't move anymore >> stephanie: and how do we resolve these numbers by kicking the downed to -- down-trodden. poor shaming is the justification that people are -- leave it to americans to kick people when they are down. and that's what they did again with the farm bill. >> they tell poor people to get a job. and they have a job, and they say they can't feed their family or pay their rent, and republicans say
respects and admires women throughout america. that is why it gives me great pleasure tonight to honor one of the greatest american female politicians with the beacon award. the beacon award was begun in 2008 and it was created to give an award to an outstanding nationallyatewide or who exemplifies the best of the democratic party ideals and values. 2008, it was awarded to senator edward kennedy. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy and berkeley. to u.s. senator john culver. to senatet went majority leader mike. last year's award went to tom harkin. i am pleased to announce that this year's beacon award has been awarded to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage, before i give a little about senator and secretary of state hillary clinton's bio, i have some women with me who are here to accept the award on secretary clinton's the half. with that, a little bit of bio information about secretary clinton and then we will have joy who will represent our group of north iowa democratic women to accept the award. on january 21, 2009, hillary clinton was sworn in as the 67th secre
not? >> got to go in. >> come on rob, get it in there to get three points. >> one point. >> america is still learning the beautiful game. >> that will help. >> coming up next, economist dr. jeffe jeffery sacks joins us and bill bratton and nbc political director chuck todd. >> chuck winked at you. >> oh, god. >> wink again. >> the winker. >> he just did. >> and, of course, the great andrea mitchell. >> she's great. >> "morning joe" back in a moment. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping i'to guard their manhood with trnew depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com wit's hard to find contractors with the passion and the skill, and that's why we use angie's list. online or on the phone, we help you hire right the first time with honest reviews on over 720 local services. i want it done right. i don't want to have to worry about it or have to come back and redo it. with angie's list, i was able to turn my home into the home of my dreams. for
of america, of giving asylum to edward snowden, the president absolutely cannot go to a bilateral conversation with vladimir putin. >> so there's always a little moment for me, when condi rice and president obama are on the same policy page that always makes me want to pause and say, let's talk about that. do you agree? >> absolutely. i think the reset was great. they got as much out of it as you could. they got the start treaty, the transit route to afghanistan through russia, but then, things started to kind of go sour around the time of libya. the russians felt duped. they had abstained from vetoing at the security council. they couldn't vote in favor of it, but they abstained and felt the u.s. did a lot more than they said they were going to do. on their watch, qaddafi was killed. and the ambassador was harassed for months on the ground, in a very unprofessional, very sort of, this is not what states do to each other. and it went on from there. syria was a major irritant. and what you heard from the white house during this period was like, look, if you guys don't want to talk,
this episode illustrates two important elements in modern america politics. the first one is, the rise of a super staffer in the case of benton who as peter mentioned is is married to the granddaughter of ron paul. he's got leverage here because the fact is, mitch mcconnell, veteran u.s. senator, the senate minority leader, needs this staffer badly. because he's a bridge to rand paul and the paul universe. mitch mcconnell already has a primary opponent on the right. he cannot afford to alienate the paul world by dumping the staffer overboard he would do just that. it's a remarkable illustration of the role of a super staffer now in american politics. the other big point it illustrates, john, is this. the tea party's rise and near dominance now in the republican party. the fact that a powerful senator like mitch mcconnell, well funded, 10 million bucks in the bank, the fact he so needs the tea party on his side that he has a staffer here criticizing him on tape and he's not dumping him, tells you all you have to know about the role in today's gop of the tea party. >> ross, let me ask yo
. they basically i believe probably are looking at all the cell phone calls in america every day. also, i don't think it's good police work. i think we get overwhelmed with data. we have so much data that he we don't notice when the -- goes back to check that, his name is misspelled and we don't know he has gone back. we need more people doing specific intelligence data on people who we have suspicion of rather than doing it on suspicion list severance of all american phone calls. >> john: let me switch gears and talk to you about obama care because that is going to be a big topic of discussion when congress comes back in a couple of weeks. you support the defunding of obama care but you recently acknowledged you don't believe it will happen and get through the senate. your only leave then lever is to defund obama care. that would shut down the government which you have stated publicly you don't think is a good idea. what do you really have left here, senator? >> well, i don't think shutting down the government is a good idea. but i do think that we were elected, conservatives were elected to
the contents of vast amounts of america's emails and text communications in and out of the country hunting for people who mention information about foreigners under surveillance. while it has long known that the agency conducts searches, this reveals more about the scale of secret operations. government officials say it was authorized by the fisa amendment act which congress approved eavesdropping as long as it was a non-citizen abroad. it gets a little in the weeds for me. >> i know. stephanie: i mean, that's what's -- as we've said, jim, it's not that i don't have concerns about it, i think that's why it's not that understandable for the normal person to go i don't know what degree they're doing what exactly. >> exactly, and that's what's so troubling about it, that it's just a broad, you know, drag net. stephanie: yeah. you know what will make us feel better? maggot on fax. hi, bob. that would be a stretch to call any fax about maggots fun, but go ahead. >> they are very handy for eating dead flesh. you have a piece of flesh that's dead on your body that's rotting, doctors, american doc
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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